Twenty-second Sunday in Ordinary Time – August 31, 2014

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Last Outdoor Mass of 2014. Wishing Godspeed to our summer parishioners - we will keep you in our prayers.
Last Outdoor Mass of 2014. Wishing Godspeed to our summer parishioners – we will keep you in our prayers.

Pastor’s Desk

A husband and wife, together with their young son, were invited to a neighbor’s wedding. For the little boy, it was the first opportunity to attend such an affair. As the family entered the Church, an usher extended his elbow and asked, “Are you on the bride’s side or the groom’s?” Before his parents could respond, the youngster exclaimed in a shocked tone, “Are they taking sides already?”

In the Old Testament story of the golden calf, Moses is up on the mountain in deep communication with the Living God. He is receiving the Law — the Commandments. But while he is up there, the people down below grow impatient. They go to Moses’ brother, Aaron, and they say, “We want a god we can worship.” Aaron takes the people’s gold and fashions it into a calf for them to worship. When Moses comes down from the mountain and sees his people dancing around the golden calf, he is so outraged that he smashes the Tablets of the Law, grinds the calf to powder, disperses it in the water and makes the idolaters drink it. Moses looked out over the camp full of people and he issued this clear challenge to them: “Who is on the Lord’s side? Come and stand with me.” A thousand years passed. Jesus of Nazareth came at a time when the problem of idolatry had grown greater. It was no longer a golden calf. It was a much more subtle thing. When Jesus came, He saw that, as in the time of Moses, the people were turning away from the one true God. They were trying to find their security and their pleasure and their power in other things. And so He spent a great deal of time in His ministry trying to destroy the idols, trying to get people to give up their loyalties to these false gods.

Jesus was not crucified because He showed mercy to a lot of people and healed a lot of people. He was crucified as a rebel, struggling for social justice, struggling for change.

What does all of this mean to us today? It means that there are times when being faithful to our Christian Mission can be costly to us; times when we can expect to hear people lashing out at us for standing up for a just society. But it is this very costliness that is so valuable a way to be with God. It is part of the sacrifice, part of the price we pay. It is the opportunity to say “God, I really do love You. I am now, and forevermore on your side — and I am willing to do this for You, though it may be unpopular.”

In this regard, someone has said, “One person on God’s side is a majority.” In this worshiping experience, we must find our way to the foot of the Cross and to the altar of God, confident that as we stand with our Lord, we are on the “right side” with God. A while back, there was a greeting card on the market which contained a delightful definition of friendship. “”A friend” it said “Is someone who knows you don’t know what you’re talking about but will let you reach that conclusion independently.”

As a Christian community, in the matter of our faith, hopefully we all know what we are talking about when we say: “I am on God’s side!”

PEACE AND BLESSINGS!

Fr. Luis

Our Last Menu for 2014 we had a huge crowd and took in our largest ever donations!
Our Last Menu for 2014 we had a huge crowd and took in our largest ever donations!

We still have a few aprons for sale on line.

Thank you to Fr. Logan for saying mass today in Fr. Luis’ absence. Fr. Luis is on vacation and will be returning this week. Fr. Logan gave a wonderful homily today, telling two stories of fathers. One was about a man in Turkey who was trapped in the collapse of a six story building for 4 days. An earthquake had caused the collapse and he had little hope of being rescued. He couldn’t move, he was in a restricted space, he couldn’t roll over or sit up. He had scolded his thirteen year old son for monopolizing the family computer the day before the earthquake, and regretted that he might not have the opportunity to see his son again. He prayed and on the fourth day he heard the voice of his relatives, including his son, looking for him in the rubble. When he was rescued he told his family he was changing his life. The tragedy had taught him a lesson and the trauma had galvanized his will to live differently. Having nearly lost his life, he learned to cherish it. The second father was the famous football coach Gene Stallings. Even though he had a perfect season and public recognition in his career, Coach Stallings said the greatest reward was raising his son with Down’s Syndrome. Like many parents of Downs Syndrome children, Stallings described the sunny disposition and the unselfish personality of his son. “Johnny was 46 years old and didn’t know a bad word. He saw the good in everyone. He loved going to church on Sundays and Wednesdays, and he remembered everyone’s name.”

Our values are very disordered, and in the second reading today we are told by Paul “Do not conform yourselves to this age but e transformed by the renewal of your mind, that you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and pleasing and perfect.” The stories of these two fathers tells us the miraculous power of suffering and faith which can inspire such love in the human heart. Thank you Fr. Logan for calling us to order our lives.

 

Two important dates to remember:

Next Saturday, Sept. 6 is registration and first class for Holy Communion Classes

First Holy Communion Classes
First Holy Communion Classes

Sept. 27, 2014, Saturday is the Dinner and Auction Fundraiser “Harvest for Humanity” for the St. Vincent de Paul Society

St. Vincent de Paul Society Fund Raiser
This fund raiser benefits the Free Dining Room operated by the St. Vincent de Paul Society in Santa Rosa.
What a joy to have a large group of visitors from the East Bay. Fr. Logan said mass as Fr. Luis was on vacation.
What a joy to have a large group of visitors from the East Bay. Fr. Logan said mass as Fr. Luis was on vacation.

St. Colman enjoyed a large crowd of visitors at Sunday mass at 11:00 in Cazadero. Having a full house is a great joy and we welcomed our visitors with great appreciation! It is a reminder to all of us be sure to extend hospitality and friendliness to our communities and live our lives in a way that leads people to God.

St. Colman's on Labor Day
Full house!

 

St. Colman Outdoor Church
St. Colman Outdoor Church

 

White chocolate angel with red velvet cake and truffle filling
White chocolate angel with red velvet cake and truffle filling

This Sunday we took in the highest amount in donations all summer. Thank you so much for your generosity! It has been absolutely joyful to serve coffee and treats to all of you this summer! But we’re getting too fat eating all these goodies, so it’s a blessing in disguise the outdoor masses will end and with it our high calorie treats!!! But we will be back! See you next year! xoxoxo

 

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Twenty-First Sunday in Ordinary Time August 24, 2014

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Flowers from the garden of Sue Poirier brighten our Sundays at St. Elizabeth's.
Flowers from the garden of Sue Poirier brighten our Sundays at St. Elizabeth’s.

Pastor’s Desk

There’s a modern parable called, “Creatures of Habit,” a good farmer and his wife are feeling secure and snug in their little home. But winter is coming on, and the old barn needs fixing—its roof is leaky, a few boards had rotted off the sides, and the dirt floor is uneven, so puddles collect water when it rains. The farmer is a sensitive man who loves animals and so he arranged for a new barn be built before winter time comes.

The day finally arrive when the new barn is finished and the old barn torn down, and the farmer no longer feels guilty in leaving the animals in a cold, drafty barn while he is in a snug home.

Next morning, he gets up early to go to the town for supplies, before leaving, he puts the animals out to pasture, but leaves the barn doors open in case the weather should turn bad.

While he was in town, the weather does change for the worse. The temperature drops and it begins to rain and the rain turns to sleet. The farmer feels good as he thinks about the animals taking shelter in their brand new home. When he arrives back at the farm, he goes directly to the new barn to check on the animals, but the barn is empty. He runs outside, he looks around, and sees a strange sight. There are the animals, miserable and huddled together, with a drift of sleet and snow on their backs, as they stand within the outline of the foundation where the old barn had been: CREATURES OF HABIT!

We are creatures of habits, the apostle Paul reminds us when he talks about obedience to God. He tells us specifically that, through the act of the will, we must get rid of certain habits. “Kill off everything in you that belongs only to earthly life.” He says, “kill off fornication and impurities and guilty passion and evil desires and greed; getting angry and being bad tempered and spitefulness and abusive language and lies and dirty talk—give up these things.” Paul writes in his letter to the Collossians chapter 3 verses 5 to 7.

Now if you don’t find yourself on that list of bad habits, you are a remarkable person.

However, I think there is something there for everybody. Paul is listing some destructive habits that have to go because they are blocking God’s movement in your life, as disciples of Christ these bad habits must go. Moreover, Paul says, that the destructive habits must be replaced with a constructive habits. “Put on, as God’s chosen ones,” he says, “sincere compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness, patience, .bear with one another, forgive whatever grievance you have with one another—PUT ON LOVE [Col.3: 12-13, 14]

Peace and Blessings

Fr. Luis

We had a 6.0 earthquake in nearby Napa at 3:30 am so it was especially comforting to say mass together and thank God we are all safe! Poor Fr. Luis had interrupted his vacation to come back and say mass, only to be rudely awakened by the shake, rattle and roll of the old rectory, whose foundation is weakening and is due for repair. Perched on a steep hillside, it is typical of the older homes in the area, many of which need shoring up from time to time.

Today’s gospel is Matt 16:13-20. Father’s homily drew on the penetrating question Jesus poses to Peter: “But who do you say I am?” Father pointed out that the word “question” has within it the word “quest” and that through questioning we find out not only who Jesus is, but who God wants us to be. He told a wonderful story of his neice whom he took for an ice cream at ColdStones, prior to seminary, when he was a young, worldly man. She asked him if she could ask him a question and she asked him “Are you a dad or a kid?” Funny how kids can do that – in their simple innocent way, they can ask very thought provoking questions.

Father then went on to describe how Jesus gave the name of “rock” or “Petrus” to Peter, even though at many times Peter was anything but solid. But with the grace of God, Peter was able to become the rock of our church. We took can become what God wants us to be, even though we have many failings and confusions. Father reminded us always to be kind, to understand that everyone we meet is struggling with burdens that we don’t know about. Kindness is always appropriate and wise.

Father shared with us his experience in counseling troubled adolescents. Most of these young adults are very difficult to counsel because they have no knowledge or experience with kindness or love. Those are just words, abstractions, with no memory or association in their minds. That is one example of how kindness, even from a stranger, can help some one from such a background. With the grace of God, others can perceive your kindness and it can motivate them to emulate your virtue.

This call to kindness is repeated in PASTOR’S DESK, published above. In it Fr. Luis writes:

However, I think there is something there for everybody. Paul is listing some destructive habits that have to go because they are blocking God’s movement in your life, as disciples of Christ these bad habits must go. Moreover, Paul says, that the destructive habits must be replaced with constructive habits. “Put on, as God’s chosen ones,” he says, “sincere compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness, patience. Bear with one another, forgive whatever grievance you have with one another – PUT ON LOVE (Col.3:12-13; 4)

In ending his homily Fr. Luis strongly exhorts us to face the struggles in the world next week remembering this gospel, and remembering we must resist the things of this world and stay focused on becoming who God has created us to be.

 

 

AFTER MASS COFFEE & PASTRIES

Fresh local Black Mission Figs and home made Valencay Goat and Cows Milk Double Cream Cheese - we call it "St. Hubert's Valencay" in honor of St. Hubert, after whom our meeting hall is named.
Fresh local Black Mission Figs and home made Valencay Goat and Cows Milk Double Cream Cheese – we call it “St. Hubert’s Valencay” in honor of St. Hubert, after whom our meeting hall is named.
Blum's Coffee Crunch Cake, loved by San Franciscans over 60! A lemon sponge cake with whipped cream frosting and coffee honeycomb crunch topping!
Blum’s Coffee Crunch Cake, loved by San Franciscans over 60! A lemon sponge cake with whipped cream frosting and coffee honeycomb crunch topping!

We served Blum’s Coffee Crunch Cake again and lest we break into another rant, let’s just say this is a favorite of many San Franciscans over 60. Here’s the Recipe Salmon on Puff Paste, St. Hubert’s Valencay (home made!) on Black Mission Figs, S’mores Muffins, Coffee Cake and Croissants filled with creme fraiche (home made!) and fresh blackberries completed our offerings this morning. It has been an absolute joy serving coffee and treats this summer, we have gotten to know more of our parishioners and visitors in serving. Thank you for your generous donations. We have only one more Sunday to the summer and will be thinking of other ways to have get togethers with yummy treats and good conversations!

Two important events to remember:

First Holy Communion Classes
First Holy Communion Classes
St. Vincent de Paul Society Fund Raiser
This fund raiser benefits the Free Dining Room operated by the St. Vincent de Paul Society in Santa Rosa.

Have a wonderful week! God bless you all!

 

Twentieth Sunday in Ordinary Time – Sunday August 17, 2014

 

White chocolate angel with red velvet cake and truffle filling
White chocolate angel with red velvet cake and truffle filling

Saturday, August 16, 2014 / 9:40 PM

The salmon on puff paste, the cake pops and the Blum’s Coffee Toffee Cake are safely stored in the refrigerator in St. Hubert’s Hall in preparation for our second to last Meet and Greet after the 9:00 AM outdoor Mass. Grapes are in harvest, pear trees are bending low with fruit and I am swept with nostalgia, thinking there are only two more Sundays left to this summer.

I would like to express my sincere thanks to all of you for your generous donations and your kind words during our meet and greet coffee sessions this summer. I am especially grateful to Guild President Fran Korn and Treasurer Jean Koutz and husband Ken, who have helped me each Sunday morning. It has been so much fun making treats for my church family, seeing my old classmates from St. Emydius, Mercy and Dominican and making new friends as well. or our summer parishioners, bless all of you, we will keep you in our prayers and look forward to seeing you next summer. Prayers and blessings for our year round parishioners as well and please let us know your thoughts and feelings about how the Guild might best serve the parish. Thank you Fr. Luis for shepherding all of us on our way to heaven.

xoxoxo

Irene

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John O’Connell singing the Psalm last Sunday.

Misty North performing solo for the gospel acclamation.

Fr. Luis is enjoying a vacation and Fr. Francis will be saying masses this week end.

Here is our menu for this week end. Thank you to Sara Robles for making Gelatinas Encapsuladas again! And to Fran Korn for making a delicious Pear Cake.

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Our menu features the memorable Blum's Bakery Coffee Crunch Cake, also called Coffee Toffee Cake.
Our menu features the memorable Blum’s Bakery Coffee Crunch Cake, also called Coffee Toffee Cake.

Note: We will be selling aprons again, but have only one left in stock. A new order arrives on Wednesday.

We also want to give a shout out to our beloved Giants and made cake pop angels in the orange and black uniforms!

Giants Cake Pops joined our angels.
Giants Cake Pops joined our angels.

 

St. Elizabeth's Cake Pops
Visitors from San Francisco took home a bouquet of cake pops!

 

 

Here’s the recipe! CoffeeToffeeCakeRecipe And here’s a site with good photos showing methods with this cake cut into 3 layers.

St. Elizabeth Guild Treasurer Jean Koutz and President Fran Korn
St. Elizabeth Guild Treasurer Jean Koutz and President Fran Korn
White chocolate angel cake pops.
White chocolate angel cake pops.

http://fancyfoodfancy.wordpress.com/2010/04/22/blums-coffee-crunch-cake/

 

Every Sunday we enjoy these beautiful floral arrangements from Sue Poirier. Sue grows the flowers and arranges them and we look forward to them each week. Thank  you Sue!
Every Sunday we enjoy these beautiful floral arrangements from Sue Poirier. Sue grows the flowers and arranges them and we look forward to them each week. Thank you Sue!

Nineteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, August 10, 2014

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Flowers grown and arranged by Sue Poierier. Every Sunday we are blessed with these glorious floral arrangements from the Poirier family!
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Readings

1 Kgs 19:9, 11-13 / Ps 85:9-14 / /Rom 9:1-5 / Matt 14:22-23

Pastor’s Desk

There is a parable about a man who was riding on a train but didn’t know where he was going. There was good companionship among the passengers: they talked and laughed and made lan together for the days ahead. And there was music. It was a good trip, except that, now and then, a beloved fellow passenger would suddenly leave the train. The man who didn’t know his own destination wept whenever a friend would leave. “It isn’t fair,” he said. “If we coul donly know where they are going and what they are doing.”

Then, one day, he felt a tapping on his shoulder and, in an instant, he was standing on a station platform, the train roaring away in the distance. All around him were familiar faces — friends from the past who had come to welcome him. All around him there was incomparable peace, beauty and light — eons beyond the limits of the stuffy train.

The man could feel an awesome, wonderful Presence beside him and he cried out: “Why weren’t we told it would be like this?” To which an exquisitely gentle voice replied, “My son, if you had known your destination and the littleness of your journey, would you have troubled to discover the meaning of life in the beauty of nature, in good relationships, in good friends, in good times, i good feelings?”

Like a people once buffeted by the winds and waves of despair who have seen a great light — may you follow that light and find meaning in this moment of time. More importantly,may you find that you can trust absolutely in the larger meaning that made it all possible. Follow the light and you will find the hidden God waiting to welcome you into His Kingdom of Love!

Indeed a great load will be be taken from the minds of all who have complete trust in God.

Buoyed by our trust in God, may we arrive at that ultimate, “walking on air destination” which is now, and forevermore, the Kingdom of God, which is the Kingdom of Love.

Peace and Blessings!

Fr. Luis.

Today’s gospel (Mt 14:22-33) is the story of Jesus walking on the water and the the unsuccessful attempt by Peter to walk on the water. Fr. Luis began by explaining that water throughout the bible is a symbol of chaos and power, submissive to the power of God. In Genesis we are told of the unformed waters with God hovering above in a majestic poetic metaphor; we have the stories of miraculous parting of the waters by Moses and Elisha. Throughout water represents the tumultuous nature of our lives and the power of faith to overcome the tumult.

Peter begins to sink when his fear overtakes his faith, and the lesson of course is to keep our focus on Jesus.

Fr. Luis illustrated the point further with the story of the massacre of the French Cistercian monks at Notre Dame de l’Atlas in Algeria in 1996. The subject of the French film “Of Gods and Men,” the abbot wrote a document predicting their fate, in which he prayed that he would see his Muslim brothers in heaven. The monks voted to remain in Algeria as testimony to their devotion to Christ and their mission. Fr. Luis explained that it is by focusing on faith that we can face even the worst catastrophes in life, that we can “walk on water” by focusing on Jesus.

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The story of Jesus saving Peter attempting to walk on water; image is screen capture from CATHOLICISM DVD 1.

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Thank you to our Music Ministry for gracing our mass. Note to visitors and parishioners: if you would like to support the music ministry, mail a check marked “MUSIC MINISTRY” to

Fr. Luis Peñaloza

14095 Woodland Drive

Guerneville, CA 95446.

We are especially grateful to SARA ROBLES today for her beautiful Gelatinas Encapsulada.

Gelatina Encapsulada
These beautiful desserts were made by Sara Robles. Each one is hand made, carefully forming the flowers with a syringe inside the gelatin.

We also enjoyed angel pop cakes – humorous little misshapen faces with halos and wings!

Angel Pop Cakes
Angel Pop Cakes
Gelatinas Encapsuladas
Close up of Gelatinas Encapsuladas made by Sara Robles. Sara learned to make these at Escuela Culinaria Internacional in Cordoba, Veracruz. Each flower is made carefully by injecting colored gel into the gelatin, forming the flowers and leaves.

Gelatinas Encapsaladas made by Sara Robles

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Gelatina Encapsulada will be served at coffee following our 9:00 AM mass on Sunday, Aug. 10, courtesy of Sara Robles. Sara took a oourse at the Escuela Culinaria Internacional in Cordoba, Veracruz. She was kind enough to invite me to her home to learn how to make them. The process involves making a clear jello and using a syringe inserting colored gel to make the flowers. An almond flavored milk pudding forms the white base and background for the flowers, which resemble paper weights. Stop after mass to see them!

UPDATE: Sarah will be giving a workshop on Wednesday Sept. 17 at 1:00 at St. Hubert’s Hall. It’s free and will take about 1 hour.

 

We will be serving our signature Salmon on puff paste as well as angel cake pops, croissants with creme fraiche and fresh blackberries and coffee cake. Thank you all for the generous donations which help us offset our costs. See you Sunday!

JointheGuildPopCakeAngels
St. Elizabeth’s Guild meets the first Wednesday of each month at St. Hubert’s Hall at 1:00 pm. Meetings are open to the public. Please consider joining the Guild and helping us in supporting the parish and community groups. We support the Russian River Food Pantry through the St. Vincent de Paul Society, and donate and volunteer with other community projects, in addition to our two fund raisers. Officers are Fran Korn, President, Janis Brown, Vice President. Sherilyn Parmeter is Secretary and Jean Koutz is Treasurer.

 

18th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Aug. 3, 2014

Flowers at 9:00 AM Mass
Flowers grown and arranged by Sue Poirier. After mass, Sue’s husband Larry delivered communion and these beautiful flowers to our parishioner who is under hospice care. Thank you to the Poirier family for all you do for the parish.

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Right before 9:00 AM mass Fr. Luis received tragic news that the grandson, Evan, of one of our parishioners had died. We ask that all of you pray for Evan and his family and loved ones during this time of grief.

Fr. Luis’ homily on today’s gospel (Matt 14:13-21) pointed out that this is one of most well known scriptures, recorded by each of the evangelists and used repeatedly during the year.Fr. Luis drew our attention to the dark beginning of the passage, in which Jesus learns of the death of his cousin, John the Baptist. Fr. said that bible-minded people will be reminded of all the Old Testament prophets who faced this constant threat from the hostile world, and the writing is a somber prelude to the death of Jesus. Jesus seeks to grieve alone, but is followed by a crowd of thousands. Jesus’ heart is moved with pity and he performs miracles of curing among them. This reminds us of the Israelites, wandering in the desert. As evening approaches, the apostles advise Jesus to dismiss the crowds.

Now I have heard this story probably thousands of times in my lifetime, but Fr. Luis points out something important that never struck me before: the apostle’s suggestion to disperse the crowd is sinful: “the movement of sin is always in the direction of dispersion.”

Fr. Luis also reminded us that with God all things are possible; small things can be multiplied. Our smallest acts of kindness can have many blessed ramifications even though they are small.

He also warned  us that a directive that disperses our community is from Satan, not God. Jesus, Fr. Luis points out, is a God of communion; we are often overwhelmed by life’s circumstances, we do not see how we can feed our families, or pay our bills, but we must always remember to stay in union with our faith and our families. Fr. Luis said all of this far more eloquently and I apologize for slaughtering his wonderful homily!

In facing personal and societal problems let us not succumb to cynicism or the divisiveness of politics; let us remember that with God small things can be multiplied and accomplish great things!

 

MUSIC MINISTRY:

With sad news hitting us again, after losing Cathy Gilligan and Fr. Luis’ mom last month, it was all the more consoling and uplifting to hear the beautiful music of the liturgy today. Thank you to our Music Ministry. Here are some videos of today’s mass, which we share in the hope it comforts and inspires you. It is so wonderful to have our Catholic community to pray with in times of sorrow.

On a brighter note, our Music Ministry had a special guest this morning. Beware a cuteness factor of gazillion here! Here is young Augustine Michelman (mom and dad are Christie and Kevin, friends of our choral director Rebecca Brown, visiting us from Rhonert Park) who was playing along with two sticks used as a violin and bow,  and delighting everyone around him!

Make of Our Hands a Throne, Steven C. Warner (number 597 in the Word & Song hymnal) 

Shall We Gather at the River, Robert Lowry, 1926-1899 And this is one of St. Elizabeth’s favorites! Located on the Russian River, this hymn always brings smiles to the faces of our parishioners as we “gather at the river.”  This was our “gathering” song this morning as we started mass.

Taste and See, Text and Music James E. Moore This hymn is sung before communion, it invites people to receive communion in a holy and respective state of mind.

“Sing Hallelujah”composed by Paul Wilbur 

The rhythm of this version of the Hallelujah is popular at St. Elizabeths! This music is part of the full version of “Sing Hallelujah” used here for the gospel acclamation. Thank you Eric Lindenbusch for help with the notes!

Lord Hear Our Prayer 

For people who are not Catholics I should explain this is not a hymn but rather part of the sung liturgy. It occurs after the reading of the gospel and the homily. It is always a moment of powerful communion as we pray together for personal, regional, national and worldwide problems. At daily mass, where we do not have a choir, we do not sing this but recite the refrain. If you would like to learn more about the Catholic mass, consider taking a Catholic Adult Education program. You can register by phone by calling the office (707) 869-2107. Please understand we are a tiny parish in a resort area so our schedules and staffing are seasonal.

Hosannah in the Highest 

Lamb of God 

This is another example of sung liturgy. The priest has the option to sing this or say it. The profound mysteries of the Catholic mass and the soaring emotions associated with meditative prayer at mass have attracted the world’s best composers.If you search for “sacred music”  + “mass” you will discover the vast collection of glorious music in service to God.

We share this music with you not to show off or brag but to invite you to join us in prayer. We are deeply grateful to our choir and our musicians for their generous contribution to our mass. We also invite you to join us for our coffee service after mass which is free of charge. It’s an informal affair but we have delicious treats and friendly people! Please come say hello and enjoy a pastry or savorie!

Menu for Aug. 3 Meet and Greet
Menu for Aug. 3 Meet and Greet

 

CakePopsHeading
Don’t miss the Cake Pops presented with Disney Princesses and butterfly rings for our little girls! They are devils food cake with dark chocolate truffle inside frosting and tinted white chocolate coating! YUM! Note: you won’t be seeing these again soon! They might look easy to make but they are anything but! First of all, when you dip them in the chocolate, they fall off and you have to fish them out! Then you have to clean off the stick. Then the next morning about 1/3 of them had slid down their sticks and my Disney Princesses had chocolate cake stuck in their crowns!!! THEN driving them to church caused more of the balls to slide down…well you get the idea! But they were still delicious, if not picture perfect!
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Our most popular item: Salmon Salad! We serve it on puff paste but it’s delicious on anything from french bread to focaccia to bagels! See the recipe on our Recipes post.